Lynchburg Holds Its Annual Music Festival

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Lynchburg Holds Its Annual Music Festival

Courtesy of the Lynchstock Music Festival's Facebook page

Courtesy of the Lynchstock Music Festival's Facebook page

Courtesy of the Lynchstock Music Festival's Facebook page

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Each year, the city of Lynchburg hosts a music event by the name of Lynchstock. Started in 2013, the event hosts local artists as well as national artists for performances throughout the night. The festival also hosts poetry readings,spoken word, vendors and art. This  year’s Lynchstock was hosted October 15th with performances by Noah Gundersen, Joel Kaiser, Jeff Carl and Jake Ziegler & The Locals. The music festival was held at the Academy Center of the Arts on Main Street and attracted a crowd consisting of mostly young adults and teenagers.

“It was a lot of fun,” Joel Kaiser, one of the performers from northern Virginia, said. “I’m lucky to be working with professional musicians and I’ve played here once before. My advice to any younger potential artists is to just keep writing. If you don’t perform, nobody will ever understand what you’re writing about. If you want to make it your life, you have to make it your career.”

The event is also enjoyable by students who have hobbies based on music and some even find it inspiring. Students from all over the area attended and many liked the output the festival gave.

“I think it’s a good event for performers trying to get their feet wet and I think it’s a good opportunity to meet people with the same interests,” senior Matthew McKown said, who is interested in music making. “For performers who aren’t really noticed or heard of, they get a chance to perform and can use it as a practice to get prepared and ready for the bigger show. It gives younger performers a chance to see people who have been doing it a while or just starting out and how they do it. How they perform, what they do. They can learn from it without having to spend a ton of money to go to a big show. Also, it’s community. If it’s local it’s not like the person is famous and won’t want anything to do with you.You can talk to the person.”

Not only does Lynchstock appeal to musical students, but poets and writers as well.

“It’s artistic,” freshman Jazmine Knowles said, who writes poetry as a hobby. “There were quality performances and everyone just had a really nice time. It was really fun and everyone there was just really excited and happy. It’s nice to see that small town people can make it up there onto bigger canvases.”